Hypothyroid Support (Underactive Thyroid) 120 Capsules

Hypothyroid Support (Underactive Thyroid) 120 Capsules

R350.00 Incl. VAT

0.0/5

Our natural herbal supplement is meticulously formulated to offer comprehensive support for individuals dealing with an underactive thyroid, including cases related to autoimmune conditions like Hashimoto’s disease. This blend incorporates adaptogens and vital nutrients, synergistically aiding the body’s innate mechanisms to restore optimal thyroid function.

What is the Thyroid?

  • The thyroid gland is a vital endocrine organ situated in the neck, below the thyroid cartilage commonly known as the Adam’s apple. It consists of two lobes connected by a thin bridge called the isthmus. The entire structure somewhat resembles a butterfly or a bow tie.

Anatomy: The thyroid gland’s primary function is to produce and release thyroid hormones—thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3). These hormones play a crucial role in regulating metabolism, growth, and development. The release of thyroid hormones is controlled by the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis.

Pathology: Several disorders can affect the thyroid gland. Hypothyroidism occurs when the gland doesn’t produce enough hormones, leading to fatigue, weight gain, and cold sensitivity. Hyperthyroidism, on the other hand, results from an excess of thyroid hormone production, causing symptoms such as weight loss, increased heart rate, and heat intolerance.

Autoimmune conditions like Hashimoto’s thyroiditis and Graves’ disease can also impact the thyroid. Hashimoto’s leads to inflammation and gradual destruction of thyroid tissue, often resulting in hypothyroidism. Graves’ disease involves the overproduction of thyroid hormones, leading to hyperthyroidism, and is characterized by an autoimmune attack on the thyroid.

Structural abnormalities like thyroid nodules or goitre, an enlarged thyroid, are common. These can be benign or, in some cases, cancerous. Regular monitoring, diagnostic imaging, and hormone level assessments are crucial in managing thyroid health and addressing potential pathologies.

How does the Thyroid work?

The thyroid is a butterfly-shaped gland located in the front of the neck, just below the Adam’s apple. Its primary function is to produce and release thyroid hormones, namely thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3), which play crucial roles in regulating metabolism and energy production throughout the body. The thyroid’s activity is tightly controlled by the hypothalamus and pituitary gland through a feedback loop.

The process begins with the hypothalamus releasing thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH), signalling the pituitary gland to release thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH). TSH then stimulates the thyroid gland to produce and release T4 and some T3 into the bloodstream. T4 is the inactive form, and it gets converted to the active T3 primarily in the liver and other tissues.

T3 and T4 play vital roles in influencing the body’s metabolic rate, growth, and development. They affect nearly every organ and cell, regulating processes such as heart rate, body temperature, and energy expenditure. The thyroid system’s delicate balance is crucial for maintaining overall health and well-being. Any disruption in this intricate feedback mechanism can lead to thyroid disorders, impacting various bodily functions.

The production of thyroid hormones involves a complex interplay between the hypothalamus, pituitary gland, and the thyroid itself, known as the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis.

  • Hypothalamus: The process begins in the hypothalamus, where specialized cells detect low levels of thyroid hormones in the blood or other signals indicating the need for adjustment. In response, the hypothalamus releases thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH).
  • Pituitary Gland: TRH signals the nearby pituitary gland to release thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) into the bloodstream. TSH acts on the thyroid gland to stimulate the production and release of thyroid hormones, primarily thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3).
  • Thyroid Gland: TSH prompts the thyroid gland to take up iodine from the bloodstream and use it to synthesize T4 and a smaller amount of T3. The thyroid releases these hormones into the blood.
  • Circulation and Tissue Action: T4, the inactive form, is converted into the active T3 in various tissues, including the liver and kidneys. The circulatory system transports T3 and T4 throughout the body, where they play a crucial role in regulating metabolism, growth, and development.
  • Feedback Mechanism: As thyroid hormone levels rise, they provide negative feedback to the hypothalamus and pituitary gland. This feedback loop helps maintain a balance, preventing excessive production of thyroid hormones.

Disruptions in any part of this axis can lead to thyroid disorders. For example, if the thyroid produces insufficient hormones, it can result in hypothyroidism, whereas excessive production can lead to hyperthyroidism. Autoimmune conditions like Hashimoto’s thyroiditis and Graves’ disease can also affect the normal functioning of the thyroid and disrupt hormone levels. Regular monitoring, diagnostic tests, and appropriate treatment are crucial in managing thyroid health and ensuring hormonal balance.

Signs of an Underactive Thyroid:

Hypothyroidism, or underactive thyroid, can manifest with various signs and symptoms, which may vary in severity. Common signs include:

  • Fatigue: Feeling unusually tired or sluggish despite adequate rest.
  • Weight Gain: Unexplained weight gain or difficulty losing weight.
  • Cold Sensitivity: Increased sensitivity to cold temperatures.
  • Dry Skin and Hair: Dry, itchy skin and brittle hair.
  • Muscle Aches and Weakness: Generalized muscle pain and weakness.
  • Joint Pain: Aches and stiffness in the joints.
  • Constipation: Sluggish bowel movements and constipation.
  • Depression: Feelings of sadness, low mood, or depression.
  • Irregular Menstrual Periods: Changes in menstrual cycle, including heavier or more prolonged periods.
  • Thinning Hair: Hair loss or thinning, especially on the scalp’s outer edge.
  • Puffy Face: Swelling, particularly around the eyes and face.
  • Hoarseness: Changes in the voice, hoarseness, or a raspy quality.
  • Impaired Memory: Difficulty concentrating and memory issues.
  • Elevated Cholesterol: Increased levels of cholesterol in the blood.
  • Decreased Heart Rate: Slower heart rate (bradycardia).

Our natural herbal supplement is meticulously formulated to offer comprehensive support for individuals dealing with an underactive thyroid, including cases related to autoimmune conditions like Hashimoto’s disease. This blend incorporates adaptogens and vital nutrients, synergistically aiding the body’s innate mechanisms to restore optimal thyroid function.

What is the Thyroid?

  • The thyroid gland is a vital endocrine organ situated in the neck, below the thyroid cartilage commonly known as the Adam’s apple. It consists of two lobes connected by a thin bridge called the isthmus. The entire structure somewhat resembles a butterfly or a bow tie.

Anatomy: The thyroid gland’s primary function is to produce and release thyroid hormones—thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3). These hormones play a crucial role in regulating metabolism, growth, and development. The release of thyroid hormones is controlled by the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis.

Pathology: Several disorders can affect the thyroid gland. Hypothyroidism occurs when the gland doesn’t produce enough hormones, leading to fatigue, weight gain, and cold sensitivity. Hyperthyroidism, on the other hand, results from an excess of thyroid hormone production, causing symptoms such as weight loss, increased heart rate, and heat intolerance.

Autoimmune conditions like Hashimoto’s thyroiditis and Graves’ disease can also impact the thyroid. Hashimoto’s leads to inflammation and gradual destruction of thyroid tissue, often resulting in hypothyroidism. Graves’ disease involves the overproduction of thyroid hormones, leading to hyperthyroidism, and is characterized by an autoimmune attack on the thyroid.

Structural abnormalities like thyroid nodules or goitre, an enlarged thyroid, are common. These can be benign or, in some cases, cancerous. Regular monitoring, diagnostic imaging, and hormone level assessments are crucial in managing thyroid health and addressing potential pathologies.

How does the Thyroid work?

The thyroid is a butterfly-shaped gland located in the front of the neck, just below the Adam’s apple. Its primary function is to produce and release thyroid hormones, namely thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3), which play crucial roles in regulating metabolism and energy production throughout the body. The thyroid’s activity is tightly controlled by the hypothalamus and pituitary gland through a feedback loop.

The process begins with the hypothalamus releasing thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH), signalling the pituitary gland to release thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH). TSH then stimulates the thyroid gland to produce and release T4 and some T3 into the bloodstream. T4 is the inactive form, and it gets converted to the active T3 primarily in the liver and other tissues.

T3 and T4 play vital roles in influencing the body’s metabolic rate, growth, and development. They affect nearly every organ and cell, regulating processes such as heart rate, body temperature, and energy expenditure. The thyroid system’s delicate balance is crucial for maintaining overall health and well-being. Any disruption in this intricate feedback mechanism can lead to thyroid disorders, impacting various bodily functions.

The production of thyroid hormones involves a complex interplay between the hypothalamus, pituitary gland, and the thyroid itself, known as the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis.

  • Hypothalamus: The process begins in the hypothalamus, where specialized cells detect low levels of thyroid hormones in the blood or other signals indicating the need for adjustment. In response, the hypothalamus releases thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH).
  • Pituitary Gland: TRH signals the nearby pituitary gland to release thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) into the bloodstream. TSH acts on the thyroid gland to stimulate the production and release of thyroid hormones, primarily thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3).
  • Thyroid Gland: TSH prompts the thyroid gland to take up iodine from the bloodstream and use it to synthesize T4 and a smaller amount of T3. The thyroid releases these hormones into the blood.
  • Circulation and Tissue Action: T4, the inactive form, is converted into the active T3 in various tissues, including the liver and kidneys. The circulatory system transports T3 and T4 throughout the body, where they play a crucial role in regulating metabolism, growth, and development.
  • Feedback Mechanism: As thyroid hormone levels rise, they provide negative feedback to the hypothalamus and pituitary gland. This feedback loop helps maintain a balance, preventing excessive production of thyroid hormones.

Disruptions in any part of this axis can lead to thyroid disorders. For example, if the thyroid produces insufficient hormones, it can result in hypothyroidism, whereas excessive production can lead to hyperthyroidism. Autoimmune conditions like Hashimoto’s thyroiditis and Graves’ disease can also affect the normal functioning of the thyroid and disrupt hormone levels. Regular monitoring, diagnostic tests, and appropriate treatment are crucial in managing thyroid health and ensuring hormonal balance.

Signs of an Underactive Thyroid:

Hypothyroidism, or underactive thyroid, can manifest with various signs and symptoms, which may vary in severity. Common signs include:

  • Fatigue: Feeling unusually tired or sluggish despite adequate rest.
  • Weight Gain: Unexplained weight gain or difficulty losing weight.
  • Cold Sensitivity: Increased sensitivity to cold temperatures.
  • Dry Skin and Hair: Dry, itchy skin and brittle hair.
  • Muscle Aches and Weakness: Generalized muscle pain and weakness.
  • Joint Pain: Aches and stiffness in the joints.
  • Constipation: Sluggish bowel movements and constipation.
  • Depression: Feelings of sadness, low mood, or depression.
  • Irregular Menstrual Periods: Changes in menstrual cycle, including heavier or more prolonged periods.
  • Thinning Hair: Hair loss or thinning, especially on the scalp’s outer edge.
  • Puffy Face: Swelling, particularly around the eyes and face.
  • Hoarseness: Changes in the voice, hoarseness, or a raspy quality.
  • Impaired Memory: Difficulty concentrating and memory issues.
  • Elevated Cholesterol: Increased levels of cholesterol in the blood.
  • Decreased Heart Rate: Slower heart rate (bradycardia).

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