Stop Smoking 120 Capsules

Stop Smoking 120 Capsules

R350.00 Incl. VAT

0.0/5

Our natural herbal supplement is formulated to support those who want to stop smoking by providing a comprehensive blend of natural compounds. It aims to address various aspects of smoking cessation, from managing cravings to supporting detoxification.

How and when do people become addicted to smoking:

People become addicted to smoking primarily due to the presence of nicotine in tobacco products. Nicotine is a highly addictive substance that stimulates the release of neurotransmitters like dopamine in the brain, creating a sense of pleasure and reinforcement. Over time, individuals develop a dependency on nicotine, leading to cravings and difficulties in quitting.

The average age at which individuals start smoking can vary, but many people initiate smoking during their teenage years or early adulthood. Adolescence is a critical period for the onset of smoking habits, with factors like peer influence, social acceptance, and curiosity contributing to experimentation. However, people can start smoking at different ages, and some may begin later in life due to various influences or stressors.

What happens in the body when we smoke?

When a person smokes a cigarette, a complex series of events unfolds in the body:

  • Inhalation: As the cigarette touches the lips, the smoker inhales the smoke, which contains thousands of chemicals, including nicotine.
  • Nicotine Absorption: Nicotine is rapidly absorbed through the lungs into the bloodstream. Once in the bloodstream, nicotine travels to the brain, where it binds to receptors, stimulating the release of neurotransmitters like dopamine.
  • Dopamine Release: Dopamine is a neurotransmitter associated with pleasure and reward. The increased release of dopamine creates a sense of pleasure and reinforces the behavior of smoking, contributing to addiction.
  • Constriction of Blood Vessels: Nicotine causes blood vessels to constrict, leading to a temporary increase in blood pressure and heart rate.
  • Adrenaline Release: The stimulation of the adrenal glands results in the release of adrenaline, contributing to heightened alertness and increased energy.
  • Formation of Carbon Monoxide: Combustion of tobacco produces carbon monoxide, a toxic gas. Carbon monoxide binds to the haemoglobin in red blood cells, reducing their ability to carry oxygen, which leads to decreased oxygen levels in the body.
  • Buildup of Tar: Smoking introduces tar, a sticky residue, into the lungs. Over time, tar accumulates in the respiratory system, causing irritation, inflammation, and compromising lung function.
  • Formation of Cancers: Prolonged exposure to the toxic chemicals in cigarette smoke increases the risk of developing various cancers, particularly in the lungs, throat, and mouth.
  • Respiratory Issues: Chronic exposure to smoke damages the respiratory system, leading to conditions such as chronic bronchitis and emphysema. The cilia, hair-like structures in the airways, become impaired, resulting in mucus buildup and difficulty clearing the airways.
  • Cardiovascular Diseases: Smoking is a major risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. It contributes to the development of atherosclerosis (narrowing of the arteries), increasing the likelihood of heart attacks and strokes.
  • Addiction and Withdrawal: Nicotine addiction makes it challenging to quit smoking. Attempts to quit often lead to withdrawal symptoms such as irritability, anxiety, and cravings, reinforcing the cycle of addiction.

In summary, smoking has profound and detrimental effects on various physiological systems, leading to a range of health issues, from respiratory problems to life-threatening conditions like cancer and cardiovascular diseases. The detrimental impact extends from the initial pleasure associated with smoking to severe health consequences over time.

Damage that smoking causes to the lungs and respiratory system:

Smoking inflicts extensive damage on the lungs, contributing to various respiratory diseases. Here’s an overview of the harm caused by smoking:

  • Chronic Bronchitis: Chronic bronchitis results from smoking-induced irritation of the bronchial tubes, leading to chronic inflammation and increased mucus production. This condition manifests as a persistent cough, excessive mucus, difficulty breathing, and heightened susceptibility to respiratory infections.
  • Emphysema: Smoking causes damage to the air sacs (alveoli) in the lungs, diminishing their elasticity and compromising their ability to inflate and deflate properly. This leads to shortness of breath, wheezing, and progressive difficulty in exhaling air, with severe cases resulting in respiratory failure.
  • Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD): COPD, a combination of chronic bronchitis and emphysema, is a progressive lung disease characterized by airflow obstruction. Individuals with COPD experience a persistent cough, increased mucus production, shortness of breath, and reduced exercise tolerance. The disease is irreversible and may lead to severe disability.
  • Lung Cancer: Smoking is the primary cause of lung cancer, inducing genetic mutations that spur the uncontrolled growth of abnormal cells in the lungs. This results in persistent cough, chest pain, coughing up blood, and respiratory distress, often diagnosed at an advanced and challenging-to-treat stage.
  • Pulmonary Fibrosis: Smoking contributes to pulmonary fibrosis, scarring lung tissue and reducing the lungs’ ability to expand and contract. This condition leads to progressive shortness of breath, persistent cough, and fatigue, often irreversibly impacting lung function and requiring advanced interventions such as lung transplantation.
  • Pneumonia: Smoking weakens the immune system and damages airways, increasing susceptibility to respiratory infections like pneumonia. Symptoms include fever, cough, difficulty breathing, and chest pain, with smoking-related pneumonia often presenting as more severe and challenging to treat.
  • Pleural Disorders: Smoking raises the risk of pleural disorders such as pleurisy (inflammation of the lining around the lungs) and pleural effusion (fluid buildup around the lungs). Manifestations include sharp chest pain, difficulty breathing, and, in severe cases, respiratory distress.
  • Decreased Lung Function: Smoking accelerates the natural decline in lung function associated with aging, resulting in reduced lung capacity, impaired ability to breathe deeply, and increased vulnerability to respiratory challenges. Quitting smoking remains the most effective measure to prevent further damage to the lungs and improve overall respiratory health.

The timeline of damage caused to the lungs from the onset of the habit of smoking:

  • Healthy State: In a healthy state, the lungs consist of a complex network of airways and tiny air sacs called alveoli. The respiratory system efficiently exchanges oxygen for carbon dioxide, supporting the body’s oxygenation and waste removal. Cilia, hair-like structures in the airways, help clear mucus and particles, safeguarding the lungs from irritants and infections. Elastic lung tissue allows for effortless inhalation and exhalation.
  • Initiation of Smoking: When an individual starts smoking, the inhaled smoke introduces a multitude of harmful chemicals, with nicotine being a key culprit. Initially, the body reacts to irritants by producing excess mucus, triggering coughing to expel toxins. Over time, the repetitive exposure to smoke damages cilia, impeding their ability to clear mucus and leading to its accumulation.
  • Early Damage (Months to Years): Within months, ongoing exposure to smoke causes inflammation in the airways and compromises the elasticity of lung tissue. Chronic bronchitis may develop, characterized by persistent cough, increased mucus production, and heightened vulnerability to respiratory infections. Simultaneously, damage to alveoli may begin, contributing to early-stage emphysema. Lung function starts to decline, but symptoms might not be overt.
  • Intermediate Damage (Years to Decades): As smoking persists over the years, the damage becomes more pronounced. Emphysema progresses, with the destruction of alveoli leading to impaired gas exchange. Chronic bronchitis worsens, and the cumulative effect of toxins raises the risk of COPD. The risk of lung cancer significantly escalates due to genetic mutations induced by carcinogens in tobacco smoke. The ongoing assault on lung tissue results in irreversible scarring (pulmonary fibrosis) and decreased lung function.
  • Advanced Damage (Decades): After several decades of smoking, the lungs may be severely compromised. COPD, comprising chronic bronchitis and emphysema, manifests with severe symptoms like persistent cough, extreme shortness of breath, and respiratory distress. Lung cancer becomes a substantial threat, often diagnosed at advanced stages. Pleural disorders and pneumonia are more common due to weakened immune defenses. Pulmonary fibrosis intensifies, hindering the lungs’ ability to expand and contract.
  • End Stage: In the end stage, the lungs exhibit profound damage. COPD may lead to respiratory failure, requiring oxygen support. Lung cancer, if present, can metastasize to other organs. Pulmonary fibrosis severely restricts lung function, impacting overall health. The risk of heart disease and stroke, associated with smoking, further contributes to mortality. Quitting smoking at any stage can slow down the progression and improve lung health, emphasizing the critical importance of early intervention.

The pleasures of smoking and the pain of withdrawal:

  • Addiction Mechanism: People get addicted to smoking primarily due to the presence of nicotine in tobacco. Nicotine is a highly addictive substance that stimulates the release of neurotransmitters, particularly dopamine, in the brain’s reward system. Dopamine creates feelings of pleasure and reinforces the behavior of smoking, creating a cycle of reward and reinforcement.
  • Pleasure in the Brain and Nervous System-Nicotine mimics acetylcholine, a neurotransmitter involved in various brain functions. When nicotine binds to receptors, it triggers the release of dopamine, which creates a sense of pleasure and reinforces the association between smoking and reward. The brain adapts to the consistent influx of nicotine by adjusting receptor sensitivity and neurotransmitter production.
  • Changes During Withdrawal: When a person quits smoking, the absence of nicotine leads to withdrawal symptoms as the brain attempts to readjust. Neurotransmitter levels, particularly dopamine, initially decrease, causing feelings of irritability, anxiety, and cravings. Enzymes involved in breaking down neurotransmitters may also be affected. Over time, receptor sensitivity and neurotransmitter production gradually normalize, alleviating withdrawal symptoms.
  • Duration of Withdrawal: Withdrawal symptoms vary in duration and intensity from person to person. The acute phase typically lasts a few weeks, with the most intense symptoms occurring in the first few days. However, psychological aspects of withdrawal, such as cravings, may persist for an extended period. The brain’s adaptation and recovery process can continue for several months.
  • Relapse After One Cigarette: Even after an extended period of quitting, smoking a single cigarette can reignite cravings and reactivate neural pathways associated with addiction. This phenomenon is attributed to the brain’s memory of the pleasurable effects of smoking. Additionally, nicotine exposure, even in small amounts, can quickly rekindle physical dependence, leading to a renewed cycle of addiction.
  • Factors Influencing Relapse: Several factors contribute to relapse after quitting smoking, including stress, social situations, and psychological triggers. The brain’s association of smoking with stress relief or pleasure can override the rational decision to quit, leading individuals back to smoking. Successful long-term cessation often involves addressing both the physiological and psychological aspects of addiction and implementing effective coping strategies.

Why we recommend using both the Stop Smoking capsule and Tincture:

The herbal smoking cessation supplement employs a curated blend of botanical compounds to support individuals in their endeavour to quit smoking. Administered through a thrice-daily capsule regimen, the formulation targets multiple aspects of nicotine addiction, including neurotransmitter modulation and stress response.

Additionally, a tincture spray is provided for on-demand use when experiencing cravings. Administered orally, this tincture provides rapid absorption, influencing neurotransmitter levels to mitigate immediate urges and cravings associated with smoking.

The spray’s rapid onset and the sensation within the oral cavity contribute to a tactile experience akin to smoking, offering a satisfying alternative.

Recognizing the habitual nature of holding a cigarette, the tincture becomes a tangible replacement, allowing individuals to simulate the manual and sensory aspects of smoking. This approach aims to enhance the overall efficacy of the smoking cessation strategy by providing both physiological support and a psychological substitute for the habitual gestures associated with smoking.

Our natural herbal supplement is formulated to support those who want to stop smoking by providing a comprehensive blend of natural compounds. It aims to address various aspects of smoking cessation, from managing cravings to supporting detoxification.

How and when do people become addicted to smoking:

People become addicted to smoking primarily due to the presence of nicotine in tobacco products. Nicotine is a highly addictive substance that stimulates the release of neurotransmitters like dopamine in the brain, creating a sense of pleasure and reinforcement. Over time, individuals develop a dependency on nicotine, leading to cravings and difficulties in quitting.

The average age at which individuals start smoking can vary, but many people initiate smoking during their teenage years or early adulthood. Adolescence is a critical period for the onset of smoking habits, with factors like peer influence, social acceptance, and curiosity contributing to experimentation. However, people can start smoking at different ages, and some may begin later in life due to various influences or stressors.

What happens in the body when we smoke?

When a person smokes a cigarette, a complex series of events unfolds in the body:

  • Inhalation: As the cigarette touches the lips, the smoker inhales the smoke, which contains thousands of chemicals, including nicotine.
  • Nicotine Absorption: Nicotine is rapidly absorbed through the lungs into the bloodstream. Once in the bloodstream, nicotine travels to the brain, where it binds to receptors, stimulating the release of neurotransmitters like dopamine.
  • Dopamine Release: Dopamine is a neurotransmitter associated with pleasure and reward. The increased release of dopamine creates a sense of pleasure and reinforces the behavior of smoking, contributing to addiction.
  • Constriction of Blood Vessels: Nicotine causes blood vessels to constrict, leading to a temporary increase in blood pressure and heart rate.
  • Adrenaline Release: The stimulation of the adrenal glands results in the release of adrenaline, contributing to heightened alertness and increased energy.
  • Formation of Carbon Monoxide: Combustion of tobacco produces carbon monoxide, a toxic gas. Carbon monoxide binds to the haemoglobin in red blood cells, reducing their ability to carry oxygen, which leads to decreased oxygen levels in the body.
  • Buildup of Tar: Smoking introduces tar, a sticky residue, into the lungs. Over time, tar accumulates in the respiratory system, causing irritation, inflammation, and compromising lung function.
  • Formation of Cancers: Prolonged exposure to the toxic chemicals in cigarette smoke increases the risk of developing various cancers, particularly in the lungs, throat, and mouth.
  • Respiratory Issues: Chronic exposure to smoke damages the respiratory system, leading to conditions such as chronic bronchitis and emphysema. The cilia, hair-like structures in the airways, become impaired, resulting in mucus buildup and difficulty clearing the airways.
  • Cardiovascular Diseases: Smoking is a major risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. It contributes to the development of atherosclerosis (narrowing of the arteries), increasing the likelihood of heart attacks and strokes.
  • Addiction and Withdrawal: Nicotine addiction makes it challenging to quit smoking. Attempts to quit often lead to withdrawal symptoms such as irritability, anxiety, and cravings, reinforcing the cycle of addiction.

In summary, smoking has profound and detrimental effects on various physiological systems, leading to a range of health issues, from respiratory problems to life-threatening conditions like cancer and cardiovascular diseases. The detrimental impact extends from the initial pleasure associated with smoking to severe health consequences over time.

Damage that smoking causes to the lungs and respiratory system:

Smoking inflicts extensive damage on the lungs, contributing to various respiratory diseases. Here’s an overview of the harm caused by smoking:

  • Chronic Bronchitis: Chronic bronchitis results from smoking-induced irritation of the bronchial tubes, leading to chronic inflammation and increased mucus production. This condition manifests as a persistent cough, excessive mucus, difficulty breathing, and heightened susceptibility to respiratory infections.
  • Emphysema: Smoking causes damage to the air sacs (alveoli) in the lungs, diminishing their elasticity and compromising their ability to inflate and deflate properly. This leads to shortness of breath, wheezing, and progressive difficulty in exhaling air, with severe cases resulting in respiratory failure.
  • Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD): COPD, a combination of chronic bronchitis and emphysema, is a progressive lung disease characterized by airflow obstruction. Individuals with COPD experience a persistent cough, increased mucus production, shortness of breath, and reduced exercise tolerance. The disease is irreversible and may lead to severe disability.
  • Lung Cancer: Smoking is the primary cause of lung cancer, inducing genetic mutations that spur the uncontrolled growth of abnormal cells in the lungs. This results in persistent cough, chest pain, coughing up blood, and respiratory distress, often diagnosed at an advanced and challenging-to-treat stage.
  • Pulmonary Fibrosis: Smoking contributes to pulmonary fibrosis, scarring lung tissue and reducing the lungs’ ability to expand and contract. This condition leads to progressive shortness of breath, persistent cough, and fatigue, often irreversibly impacting lung function and requiring advanced interventions such as lung transplantation.
  • Pneumonia: Smoking weakens the immune system and damages airways, increasing susceptibility to respiratory infections like pneumonia. Symptoms include fever, cough, difficulty breathing, and chest pain, with smoking-related pneumonia often presenting as more severe and challenging to treat.
  • Pleural Disorders: Smoking raises the risk of pleural disorders such as pleurisy (inflammation of the lining around the lungs) and pleural effusion (fluid buildup around the lungs). Manifestations include sharp chest pain, difficulty breathing, and, in severe cases, respiratory distress.
  • Decreased Lung Function: Smoking accelerates the natural decline in lung function associated with aging, resulting in reduced lung capacity, impaired ability to breathe deeply, and increased vulnerability to respiratory challenges. Quitting smoking remains the most effective measure to prevent further damage to the lungs and improve overall respiratory health.

The timeline of damage caused to the lungs from the onset of the habit of smoking:

  • Healthy State: In a healthy state, the lungs consist of a complex network of airways and tiny air sacs called alveoli. The respiratory system efficiently exchanges oxygen for carbon dioxide, supporting the body’s oxygenation and waste removal. Cilia, hair-like structures in the airways, help clear mucus and particles, safeguarding the lungs from irritants and infections. Elastic lung tissue allows for effortless inhalation and exhalation.
  • Initiation of Smoking: When an individual starts smoking, the inhaled smoke introduces a multitude of harmful chemicals, with nicotine being a key culprit. Initially, the body reacts to irritants by producing excess mucus, triggering coughing to expel toxins. Over time, the repetitive exposure to smoke damages cilia, impeding their ability to clear mucus and leading to its accumulation.
  • Early Damage (Months to Years): Within months, ongoing exposure to smoke causes inflammation in the airways and compromises the elasticity of lung tissue. Chronic bronchitis may develop, characterized by persistent cough, increased mucus production, and heightened vulnerability to respiratory infections. Simultaneously, damage to alveoli may begin, contributing to early-stage emphysema. Lung function starts to decline, but symptoms might not be overt.
  • Intermediate Damage (Years to Decades): As smoking persists over the years, the damage becomes more pronounced. Emphysema progresses, with the destruction of alveoli leading to impaired gas exchange. Chronic bronchitis worsens, and the cumulative effect of toxins raises the risk of COPD. The risk of lung cancer significantly escalates due to genetic mutations induced by carcinogens in tobacco smoke. The ongoing assault on lung tissue results in irreversible scarring (pulmonary fibrosis) and decreased lung function.
  • Advanced Damage (Decades): After several decades of smoking, the lungs may be severely compromised. COPD, comprising chronic bronchitis and emphysema, manifests with severe symptoms like persistent cough, extreme shortness of breath, and respiratory distress. Lung cancer becomes a substantial threat, often diagnosed at advanced stages. Pleural disorders and pneumonia are more common due to weakened immune defenses. Pulmonary fibrosis intensifies, hindering the lungs’ ability to expand and contract.
  • End Stage: In the end stage, the lungs exhibit profound damage. COPD may lead to respiratory failure, requiring oxygen support. Lung cancer, if present, can metastasize to other organs. Pulmonary fibrosis severely restricts lung function, impacting overall health. The risk of heart disease and stroke, associated with smoking, further contributes to mortality. Quitting smoking at any stage can slow down the progression and improve lung health, emphasizing the critical importance of early intervention.

The pleasures of smoking and the pain of withdrawal:

  • Addiction Mechanism: People get addicted to smoking primarily due to the presence of nicotine in tobacco. Nicotine is a highly addictive substance that stimulates the release of neurotransmitters, particularly dopamine, in the brain’s reward system. Dopamine creates feelings of pleasure and reinforces the behavior of smoking, creating a cycle of reward and reinforcement.
  • Pleasure in the Brain and Nervous System-Nicotine mimics acetylcholine, a neurotransmitter involved in various brain functions. When nicotine binds to receptors, it triggers the release of dopamine, which creates a sense of pleasure and reinforces the association between smoking and reward. The brain adapts to the consistent influx of nicotine by adjusting receptor sensitivity and neurotransmitter production.
  • Changes During Withdrawal: When a person quits smoking, the absence of nicotine leads to withdrawal symptoms as the brain attempts to readjust. Neurotransmitter levels, particularly dopamine, initially decrease, causing feelings of irritability, anxiety, and cravings. Enzymes involved in breaking down neurotransmitters may also be affected. Over time, receptor sensitivity and neurotransmitter production gradually normalize, alleviating withdrawal symptoms.
  • Duration of Withdrawal: Withdrawal symptoms vary in duration and intensity from person to person. The acute phase typically lasts a few weeks, with the most intense symptoms occurring in the first few days. However, psychological aspects of withdrawal, such as cravings, may persist for an extended period. The brain’s adaptation and recovery process can continue for several months.
  • Relapse After One Cigarette: Even after an extended period of quitting, smoking a single cigarette can reignite cravings and reactivate neural pathways associated with addiction. This phenomenon is attributed to the brain’s memory of the pleasurable effects of smoking. Additionally, nicotine exposure, even in small amounts, can quickly rekindle physical dependence, leading to a renewed cycle of addiction.
  • Factors Influencing Relapse: Several factors contribute to relapse after quitting smoking, including stress, social situations, and psychological triggers. The brain’s association of smoking with stress relief or pleasure can override the rational decision to quit, leading individuals back to smoking. Successful long-term cessation often involves addressing both the physiological and psychological aspects of addiction and implementing effective coping strategies.

Why we recommend using both the Stop Smoking capsule and Tincture:

The herbal smoking cessation supplement employs a curated blend of botanical compounds to support individuals in their endeavour to quit smoking. Administered through a thrice-daily capsule regimen, the formulation targets multiple aspects of nicotine addiction, including neurotransmitter modulation and stress response.

Additionally, a tincture spray is provided for on-demand use when experiencing cravings. Administered orally, this tincture provides rapid absorption, influencing neurotransmitter levels to mitigate immediate urges and cravings associated with smoking.

The spray’s rapid onset and the sensation within the oral cavity contribute to a tactile experience akin to smoking, offering a satisfying alternative.

Recognizing the habitual nature of holding a cigarette, the tincture becomes a tangible replacement, allowing individuals to simulate the manual and sensory aspects of smoking. This approach aims to enhance the overall efficacy of the smoking cessation strategy by providing both physiological support and a psychological substitute for the habitual gestures associated with smoking.

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